WELCOME TO SUPRATHEL U

Welcome to the SUPRATHEL U training platform – created by experts for experts. Have fun exploring the product SUPRATHEL®, its use and application. Please feel free to contact our experts by phone or email with any questions.

SUPRATHEL® Introduction

SUPRATHEL® is a Class III medical device distributed in 36 countries across five continents. To date, more than 20,000 patients have been successfully treated in over 300 burn centers. SUPRATHEL® is based on polylactic acid and as an elastic membrane it mimics the natural skin. While being permeable to oxygen and water vapor it provides a physical barrier for microorganisms.

SUPRATHEL® is indicated in superficial (2a°) and deep dermal/partial thickness (2b°) skin loss diseases, such as burn wounds, split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites, as well as trauma and surgical wounds. To learn more about the product please go to her www.suprathel.com or contact our experts.

Benefits of using SUPRATHEL®

Several advantages support the use and application of SUPRATHEL®

Significant pain relief – by up to 60%1 

  • Significantly less IV narcotic management required
  • Minimaly manipulative dressing changes with no anesthesia

Significant reduction of infections and inflammatory response, no biologic risk1

  • Synthetic, biocompatible, absorbable
  • Minimizes risk of infections and inflammation, no reported allergic reactions

Faster wound healing2

  • Reduces healing time for STSG donor sites allowing for early reharvest
  • ROM can begin 2 to- 5 days following application

Lower treatment costs3 – by up to 69%

  • One-time wound dressing, no change of SUPRATHEL® needed
  • Less care and aftercare needed, shortened need for hospitalization
  • Less administration of pain medication needed

Good cosmetic and functional outcomes and scar quality4

SUPRATHEL® Wound

SUPRATHEL® is indicated for superficial and deep dermal/partial thickness 2nd degree skin loss diseases, areas (see white line in the burn classification for SUPRATHEL® indications).SuprathelU

Application Areas

1

Second Degree Burns

Superficial Partial Thickness Burn (degree 2a)

2a degree burn with formation of blister on a child’s foot

  • Blisters can be present
  • Involvement of the entire epidermis and upperlayers of the dermis layers of the dermis
  • Wound color will be pink or red
  • Painful and appears wet
  • Wound will blanch when pressure is applied
2

Second Degree Burns

Deep Partial Thickness Burn (degree 2b)

Mixed burns of degree 2a and 2b, right hand after an electric burn injury 1 day after debridement

  • Wound may be red or white in color, appears dry
  • Blister formation may occur
  • Destruction of the entire epidermis and part of the dermis
  • Blanching is sluggish or absent
  • Sensation may be present, but diminished

 

Case Study 1 (PDF)

3

Split Skin Graft Donor Site

Split Skin Graft Donor Site
4

Extensive Skin Abrasion

Extensive Skin Abrasion
5

Burn-like syndromes

In particular, SUPRATHEL® has been successfully used in so called “burn-like syndromes.” This describes the wide range of diseases manifested by extensive epidermal blistering and sloughing, as well as cutaneous necrosis requiring hospitalization and special intensive care management. Case Study 3 (PDF) TEN (Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis) (PDF)

Skin lesions degree 2a, 80% BSA

5.1. Wounds caused by TEN (toxic epidermal necrolysis)

TEN (toxic epidermal necrolysis) is diagnosed in patients with an extensive loss of epidermis due to necrosis and a scalded-like appearance of the skin. TEN is the most serious drug-related skin eruption with a mortality rate between 11 and 70%. Patients with less than 10% of epidermal detachment are classified as having Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, while those with more than 30% of TBSA involvement are classified as having TEN.

5.2. EB (Epidermolysis bullosa)

EB (Epidermolysis bullosa) is a genetic defect and not a disease. There are a few case reports in which SUPRATHEL® was used. The primary advantage for this indication is faster wound healing.

SUPRATHEL® -assisted surgical treatment of the hand in epidermolysis bullosa patient (PDF)

5.3. SSSS (Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome)

SSSS is caused by infection with certain strains of staphylococcus bacteria resulting in skin damage with blisters, as if the skin were scalded.

An innovative local treatment for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (PDF)

Dystrophic EB with flexion contractures of all fingers, adduction contracture of thumb, pseudosyndactyly, mitten-like deformity and blisters

5.4. Frostbite

Frostbite is an injury caused by exposure of parts of the body due to freezing.

Lunchsymposium DAV 2011_Madry (PDF)

Application of SUPRATHEL on a forefoot’s frostbite. Courtesy of Dr. M. Rapp, Stuttgart

6

SUPRATHEL® used in combination with

6.1. Autologous grafts

SUPRATHEL® can also be ideally combined with autologous grafts, e.g. on top of expanded mesh grafts.

6.2. VAC® (Vacuum Assisted Closure)

SUPRATHEL® may also be applied together with VAC®

Body Areas

In general, SUPRATHEL® can be applied to any body area in children as well as in adults. Due to its plasticity, it can be moulded and is especially suitable for difficult-to-treat areas such as the face, neck, hands and joints. In case of a reduced or even missing availability of split skin grafts, SUPRATHEL® is ideal to bridge the time gap until availability meanwhile reducing the area that needs coverage by split-skin grafts. Large affected areas can thus be temporarily covered reducing the risk of infections while providing immediate pain relief.

As a basic rule, if the total body surface area (TBSA) is below 5% and pain management is the most important in the treatment plan, SUPRATHEL® should be the first choice.

In children, all body parts can be covered with SUPRATHEL®. Even if the deep dermis is partially affected, SUPRATHEL® functions as a temporary skin substitute and does not integrate into the skin.

Areas to Avoid

  • Infected wounds
  • Exposed tendon / bone / cartilage / muscle
  • Necrotic wound area
  • Old burn wounds
  • Heavily exuding wounds
  • Tumors

Application Guide

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Burn /Partial thickness wounds / 26-year-old man / wash & disinfect (Octenisept)

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Careful debridement of injured area / sterile compress / removal of superficial tissue / inducing first capillary bleeding

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Blunt debridement / medical brush (pot-scratcher) / further capillary bleeding / thorough processing / non-bleeding and bleeding areas

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Necrosectomy (500 µm dermatome) / sharp superficial debridement of white areas / inducing capillary bleeding of these areas / no harm or exposure of subcutaneous fat

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Haemostatic procedure / Adrenalin soaked compresses 1% / possible addition of hot abdominal bandages

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Post treatment of major persisting bleeding with bipolar diathermy

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Unwrap white membrane / usable on both sides / application with a slight stretch of the porous membrane / firm fit to wound surface / capillary structure adapts immediately / cut with small overlap on each side / remainder may be used on other sites / cut excess product material

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Application on top side of fingers / cut product into finger length strips / immediate adhesion to wound site / stretch with little overlap to adjacent product

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Application of SUPRATHEL® on fingers apart / cut spaciously / no coverage of fingernails

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

covering the palmar region of the hand / spread out of all fingers / no difference in handling and adaption compared to finger sections or back of the hand

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

correction of overlapping parts with scissors

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Application on large wound surfaces / joined edge to edge / due to high plasticity product is adaptable to various body contours

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Fibrin soaked through SUPRATHEL® and the fatty gauze / adherence of the and the fatty gauze / adherence of the gauze dressing / careful removal of the gauze dressing with sterile gloves / holding SUPRATHEL® and fatty gauze tight to the wound / wound bed is visible and assessable

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Fatty gauze sheet stays in place / cut off protruding fatty gauze parts / provision of protruding fatty gauze parts / provision of counter-pressure between fatty gauze and gauze dressing to secure fatty gauze and SUPRATHEL® left in situ

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

On some areas the gauze dressing adheres stronger / provision of tangential counter pressure leaving the fatty gauze and SUPRATHEL® in place

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

The fatty gauze and SUPRATHEL® remain on wound site / cut off protruding fatty gauze parts / application of a gauze dressing above

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

After 8 days most of the damaged skin is re-epithelialiased / careful removal of fatty gauze and SUPRATHEL® in non-adherent areas

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Pain-free removal of fatty gauze and SUPRATHEL® – in non-adherent areas / deeper burned areas need about 14 days for complete epithelialization

Can’t see it on Youtube? Click here

Epithelialization of most of the superficial and deeper areas after 8 days under SUPRATHEL® / removal of the fatty gauze and SUPRATHEL® in non-adherent areas /adherent product areas to be left on wound site

Tips & Tricks

How to avoid common mistakes

SUPRATHEL® may “swim off”

Insufficient debridement: consider surgical (sharp) debridement in deeper wounds. SUPRATHEL® applied too early after trauma: wait for 24 hours after trauma in case of deeper wounds. Consider Lavasept® / Hibiclens® dressing after debridement. Insufficient hemostasis: Use 1% adrenaline and warm towels. Consider light compression dressing during the first 1-3 days. Some users utilize stripes or staples around the edges to fixate SUPRATHEL®.

Double or even triple overlay of SUPRATHEL®

Overlap of membranes should be 2-5 inches (the fatty gauze must be clearly larger than SUPRATHEL®).

Too much tension when applying

Avoid stretching the membrane when applying.

Insufficient secondary dressing (fatty gauze)

1-2 layers of fatty gauze should do.

Removal too early or removal of fatty gauze

Be patient! Leave on wound. SUPRATHEL® – will peel off – after epithelialization. Just change outer dressing.

SUPRATHEL® gets wet before or during application

Change to dry gloves before application.

SUPRATHEL® gets hot before or during application

Avoid any heat sources (e.g. lamps) before application. The thin membrane gets warm quickly.

Outer dressing too thick (humidity cannot escape)

Avoid too thick outer dressing, so the wound can “breathe”.

Frequently Asked Questions

What treatment is recommended for a contaminated wound?

At first, thorough disinfection and debridement. Then administer a local or systemic antibiotic. Local application of a disinfectant on SUPRATHEL® and monitoring of the inflammatory process secured by transparency of SUPRATHEL® and fatty gauze.

Can infections occur under SUPRATHEL®?

After thorough debridement, SUPRATHEL® forms a physical barrier against microorganisms. It also reduces the pH-value of the wound, thus inhibiting growth of bacteria and viruses.

In case of frequently which disinfectant can be used for debridement ?

Octenisept®
Lavasept®
Betadine® (colouring!)
Lavanid®Acetic acid 3%
Polyhexanide

Which fatty gauzes are recommended to apply on top of SUPRATHEL®?

Paraffinated gauzes such as
Vaseline® gauze
Bridal Veil or N-Terface® (in combination with Bacitracin®/Polysporin®)
Adaptic®
Bactigras®
Cuticerin®
Grassolind®
Jelonet® (most commonly used)

What if SUPRATHEL® dislocates?

Consider Lavasept® dressing after debridement.
Insufficient hemostasis: Use 1% adrenaline and warm towels.
Consider light compression dressing during the first 1-3 days.
Some users utilize stripes or staples around the edges to fixate SUPRATHEL®.

What are the storage temperatures?

SUPRATHEL® should be stored in a refrigerator between 8°C (46°F) and 22°C (71°F)
SUPRATHEL® is delivered in a cooling box keeping the temperature within this range. When the membrane is white and non-transparent, it is in proper condition.

Key Publications

Baartmans et al. 2010: Baartmans MG, Dokter J, den Hollander JC, Kroon AA, Oranje AP. Use of Skin Substitute Dressings in the Treatment of Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome in Neonates and Young Infants. Neonatology. 2010 Dec 9;100(1):9-13.

Baartmans M.G.A., Dokter J., den Hollander J.C., Kroon A.A. & Oranje A.P. (2010). Use of Skin Substitute Dressings in the Treatment of Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome in Neonates and Young Infants. Neonatology. 100(1):9-13.

Behr et al. 2008: Behr B, Megerle KO, Germann G, Kloeters O. Neue Konzepte in der Oberflächentherapie bei Verbrennungswunden. -New concepts in local burn wound therapy. Handchir Mikrochir Plast Chir. 2008 Dec;40(6):361-6.

Gerlach JC, Johnen C, McCoy E, Bräutigam K, Plettig J, Corcos A. Autologous skin cell spray-transplantation for a deep dermal burn patient in an ambulant treatment room setting. Burns. 2011 Jun;37(4):e19-23. doi: 10.1016/j.burns.2011.01.022. Epub 2011 Feb 19. No abstract available. PMID: 21334816 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Related citations

Harenberg et al. 2010: Harenberg PS, Hrabowski M, Ryssel H, Gazyakan E, Germann G, Engel H, Reichenberger MA. Febrile Ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann Disease. Eplasty. 2010 Jul 16;10.

Herold et al. 2011: Herold C, Busche MN, Vogt PM, Rennekampff HO. Autologe nichtkultivierte Keratinozytensuspension in der Verbrennungschirurgie – Indikationen und Anwendungstechniken. GMS Verbrennungsmedizin 2011, Vol. 4, ISSN 1869-1412

Highton et al. 2013: Highton L, Wallace C, Shah M. Use of Suprathel® for partial thickness burns in children. Burns 2013 Feb;39(1):136-41.

Kaartinen et al. 2011: Kaartinen IS, Välisuo PO, Alander JT, Kuokkanen HO. Objective scar assessment- a new method using standardized digital imaging and spectral modelling. Burns. 2011 Feb;37(1):74-81.

Kaartinen and Kuokkanen 2011: Kaartinen IS, Kuokkanen HO. Suprathel(®) causes less bleeding and scarring than Mepilex(®) Transfer in the treatment of donor sites of splitthickness skin grafts. J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2011 Sep;45(4-5):200-3

Keck et al. 2011: Keck M, Selig HF, Lumenta DB, Kamolz LP, Mittlböck M, Frey M. The use of SUPRATHEL(®) in deep dermal burns: First results of a prospective study. Burns. 2012 May;38(3):388-95. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

Kraemer et al. 2010: Kraemer B, Wallwiener M, Brochhausen C, Planck C, Hierlemann H, Isaacson KB, Rajab TK, Wallwiener C. A Pilot Study of Laparoscopic Adhesion Prophylaxis after Myomectomy with a Copolymer Designed for Endoscopic Application. J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2010 Mar-Apr;17(2):222-7.

Lindford et al. 2011: Lindford AJ, Kaartinen IS, Virolainen S, Vuola J. Comparison of Suprathel® and allograft skin in the treatment of a severe case of toxic epidermal necrolysis. Burns. 2011 Nov;37(7):e67-72. Epub 2011 Aug 17.

Lindford et al. 2011 (2): Lindford AJ, Kaartinen IS, Virolainen S, Kuokkanen HO, Vuola J. The dermis graft: Another autologous option for acute burn wound coverage. Burns. 2012 Mar;38(2):274-82. Epub 2011 Sep 7

Lumenta et al. 2009: Lumenta DB, Kamolz LP, Frey M. Adult burn patients with more than 60% TBSA involved-Meek and other techniques to overcome restricted skin harvest availability– the Viennese Concept. J Burn Care Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2):231-42.

Madry et al. 2011: Madry R, Struzyna J, Stachura-Kulach A, Drozdz L, Bugaj M. Effectiveness of Suprathel® application in partial thickness burns, frostbites and Lyell syndrome treatment. Pol Przegl Chir. 2011 Oct 1;83(10):541-8.

Markl et al. 2010: Markl P, Prantl L, Schreml S, Babilas P, Landthaler M, Schwarze H. Management of split-thickness donor sites with synthetic wound dressings: results of a comparative clinical study. Ann Plast Surg. 2010 Nov;65(5):490-6.

Merz et al. 2009: Merz KM, Wisser D, Sievers R, Reichert B. Erste Erfahrungen mit SUPRATHEL® bei zweitgradig oberflachlichen Verbrennungen im Gesicht. Plastische Chirugie 4/2009:213-18.

Merz et al. 2011: Merz KM, Sievers R, Reichert B. Suprathel®bei zweitgradig oberflächlichen Verbrennungen im Gesicht. -Suprathel® for coverage of superficial dermal burns of the face. GMS Verbrennungsmedizin 2011, Vol 4, ISSN 1869-1412

Mueller et al. 2010: Mueller E, Haim M, Petnehazy T, Acham-Roschitz B, Trop M. An innovative local treatment for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Jul;29(7):893-7.

Nolte et al. 2007: Nolte SV, Xu W, Rodemann H-P, Rennekampff H-O. Suitability of Biomaterials for Cell Delivery in Vitro. Osteo trauma care 2007; 15: 42-47.

Pfurtscheller et al. 2008: Pfurtscheller K, Zobel G, Roedl S, Trop M. Use of Suprathel dressing in a young infant with TEN. Pediatr Dermatol. 2008 Sep-Oct;25(5):541-3.

Rahmanian-Schwarz et al. 2011: Rahmanian-Schwarz A, Beiderwieden A, Willkomm LM, Amr A, Schaller HE, Lotter O. A clinical evaluation of Biobrane(®) and Suprathel(®) in acute burns and reconstructive surgery. Burns. 2011 Dec;37(8):1343-8. Epub 2011 Aug 17

Rajab et al. 2009: Rajab TK, Wallwiener CW, Brochhausen C, Hierlemann H, Kraemer B, Wallwiener M. Adhesion prophylaxis using a copolymer with rationally designed material properties. Surgery. 2009 Feb;145(2):196-201.

Rapp et al. 2007 : Rapp, M, Uhlig C, Dittel K-K. The Treatment of Mass Burn Casualties Resulting from Mass Disaster. Osteo trauma care 2007; 15: 8-16.

Ring et al. 2011: Ring A, Tilkorn D, Ottomann C, Geomelas M, Steinstraesser L, Langer S, Goertz O. Intravital monitoring of microcirculatory and angiogenic response to lactocapromer terpolymer matrix in a wound model. Int Wound J. 2011 Apr;8(2):112-7.

Ryssel et al 2010: Ryssel H, Gazyakan E, Germann G, Hellmich S, Riedel K, Reichenberger MA, Radu CA. Antiseptic therapy with a polylacticacid-acetic acid matrix in burns. Wound Repair Regen. 2010 Sep-Oct;18(5):439-44.

Ryssel et al. 2010: Ryssel H, Germann G, Riedel K, Reichenberger M, Hellmich S, Kloeters O. Suprathel-acetic acid matrix versus acticoat and aquacel as an antiseptic dressing: an in vitro study. Ann Plast Surg. 2010 Oct;65(4):391-5.

Ryssel et al. 2011: Ryssel H, Andreas Radu C, Germann G, Kloeters O, Riedel K, Otte M, Kremer T. Suprathel-antiseptic matrix: in vitro model for local antiseptic treatment? Adv Skin Wound Care. 2011 Feb;24(2):64-7.

Schwarze et al. 2007: Schwarze H, Küntscher M, Uhlig C, Hierlemann H, Prantl L, Noack N, Hartmann B. Suprathel, a new skin substitute, in the management of donor sites of splitthickness skin grafts: results of a clinical study. Burns. 2007 Nov;33(7):850-4.

Schwarze et al. 2008: Schwarze H, Küntscher M, Uhlig C, Hierlemann H, Prantl L, Ottomann C, Hartmann B. Suprathel, a new skin substitute, in the management of partial-thickness burn wounds: results of a clinical study. AdhesionAnn Plast Surg. 2008 Feb;60(2):181-5.

Schwarze et al., Burns Nov. 33/2007; Everett at al., J. Wound Care 24/2015

Uhlig et al. 2007: Uhlig C, Rapp M, Dittel KK. Neue Strategien zur Behandlung thermisch geschädigter Hände unter Berücksichtigung des Epithelersatzes Suprathel. -New strategies for the treatment of thermally injured hands with regard to the epithelial substitute Suprathel. Handchir Mikrochir Plast Chir. 2007 Oct;39(5):314-9.

Uhlig et al. 2007: Uhlig C, Rapp M, Hartmann B, Hierlemann H, Planck H, Dittel KK. Suprathel-an innovative, resorbable skin substitute for the treatment of burn victims. Burns. 2007 Mar;33(2):221-9.

Uhlig et al. 2007: Uhlig C, Hierlemann H, Dittel K-K. Actual Strategies in the Treatment of Severe Burns – Considering Modern Skin Substitutes. Osteo trauma care 2007; 15: 2-7.

Uhlig et al., Burns 33/2007; Schwarze at al., Am. Plast. Surgey 60/2009; Markl et al., Am Plast. Surg. 65/2010; Highton et al., Burns 39/2013

Uhlig et al., Burns Nov. 33/2007; Schwarze at al., Burns Nov. 33/2007; Keck et al., Burns 2012; Uhlig et al., Burns Nov. 33/2007; Highton et al., Burns 39/2013

Wallwiener et al. 2006: Wallwiener M, Brucker S, Hierlemann H, Brochhausen C, Solomayer E, Wallwiener C. Innovative barriers for peritoneal adhesion prevention: liquid or solid? A rat uterine horn model. Fertil Steril. 2006 Oct; 86 (4 Suppl): 1266-76

Contact Us

PolyMedics Innovations Inc.

8681 Highway 92, Suite 308
Woodstock, GA 30189
United States
Tel: +1 646 604 2771
Fax: +1 646 350 3129
Email: info@poly-medics.com

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SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

SuprathelU (US) – training platform

Welcome to the SuprathelU (US) – training platform – created by experts for experts. Have fun exploring the product SUPRATHEL®, its use and application. Please feel free to contact our experts by phone or email with any questions.

© 2016 PolyMedics Innovations GmbH
Heerweg 15D | 73770 Denkendorf

Tel. +49 (0) 711 7195 000
Fax + 49 (0) 711 7195 0010